RAF5 Levels

RAF5 – explain and comment on writers’ use of language, including grammatical and literary features at word and sentence level

3 – In most reading

  • a few basic features of writer’s use of language identified, but with little or no comment, e.g. ‘there are lots of adjectives’

4 – Across a range of reading

  • some basic features of writer’s use of language identified, e.g. ‘all the questions make you want to find out what happens next’
  • simple comments on writer’s choices, e.g. ‘“disgraceful” is a good word to use to show he is upset’

5 – Across a range of reading

  • various features of writer’s use of language identified, with some explanation, e.g. ‘when it gets to the climax they speak in short sentences and quickly which makes it more tense’
  • comments show some awareness of the effect of writer’s language choices, e.g. ‘“inked up” is a good way of describing how the blackberries go a bluey black colour as they ripen’

6 – Across a range of reading

  • some detailed explanation, with appropriate terminology, of how language is used, e.g. tracing an image; identifying and commenting on patterns or structure in the use of language; or recognising changes in language use at different points in a text
  • some drawing together of comments on how the writer’s language choices contribute to the overall effect on the reader, e.g. ‘all the images of flowers make the events seem less horrific and makes it even sadder’

7 – Across a range of reading

  • comments begin to develop precise, perceptive analysis of how language is used, e.g. showing how language use reflects Macbeth’s changing emotional state or explaining how euphemisms conceal brutality in a political statement
  • some appreciation of how the writer’s language choices contribute to the overall effect on the reader, e.g. demonstrating the greater effectiveness of imagery in poem A than poem B, or arguing that the use of highly emotive language in a campaign leaflet is/is not counterproductive in audience effect
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